Intel probed over sales tactics

Escalating the world's largest computer chip maker's legal woes, the Federal Trade Commission has opened a formal probe into Intel's sales tactics, a victory for its much smaller rival, Advanced Micro Devices.

Intel disclosed Friday that it has received a subpoena from the FTC for records about Intel's microprocessor sales, which dominate the world market with a roughly 80 percent share.

The FTC's two-year investigation had been considered "informal" until that point, and Intel, which is already fighting antitrust charges in the European Union and was fined this week by antitrust regulators in South Korea, said it had been cooperating.

By opening a formal investigation, Intel said, the FTC will be able to get access to documents revealing Intel's communications with certain customers - documents Intel couldn't voluntarily provide because of a protective order that is part of a sweeping antitrust lawsuit AMD filed in 2005 that isn't expected to go to trial until 2010.

"From our perspective, it's not a surprising event nor is there any really substantive change in the relationship we've had with the FTC," Bruce Sewell, Intel's general counsel, said in an interview.

The FTC's intensifying look at Intel's business practices is a result of AMD's long-running campaign to convince antitrust regulators around the world that its business has been hurt by Intel's aggressive tactics. AMD also said Friday that it received a subpoena this week from the FTC - though the company said it is not a target of the investigation.

The two companies have been fighting for years over what AMD claims is Intel's intimidation of computer makers into striking exclusive deals for the chips they use in their new machines.

AMD claims the rebates and financial incentives Intel offers to those companies for buying more Intel chips are designed to prevent AMD from gaining market share - and that Intel threatens those manufacturers that it will retaliate if they introduce models based on AMD's chips.

AMD argues that Intel's volume discounts are sometimes so steep that AMD can't cut its own prices enough to compete without losing money on the sales.

Intel has repeatedly denied breaking any laws. It said Friday that the sharp drop in microprocessor prices over the past seven years shows that the "evidence that this industry is fiercely competitive and working is compelling."

In an interview last week with The Associated Press, before the company received the subpoena, Intel Chief Executive Paul Otellini noted that Intel has been investigated by the FTC and the Department of Justice before, and he said he stands by the company's actions.

Escalating the world's largest computer chip maker's legal woes, the Federal Trade Commission has opened a formal probe into Intel's sales tactics, a victory for its much smaller rival, Advanced Micro Devices.

Intel disclosed Friday that it has received a subpoena from the FTC for records about Intel's microprocessor sales, which dominate the world market with a roughly 80 percent share.

The FTC's two-year investigation had been considered "informal" until that point, and Intel, which is already fighting antitrust charges in the European Union and was fined this week by antitrust regulators in South Korea, said it had been cooperating.

By opening a formal investigation, Intel said, the FTC will be able to get access to documents revealing Intel's communications with certain customers - documents Intel couldn't voluntarily provide because of a protective order that is part of a sweeping antitrust lawsuit AMD filed in 2005 that isn't expected to go to trial until 2010.

"From our perspective, it's not a surprising event nor is there any really substantive change in the relationship we've had with the FTC," Bruce Sewell, Intel's general counsel, said in an interview.

The FTC's intensifying look at Intel's business practices is a result of AMD's long-running campaign to convince antitrust regulators around the world that its business has been hurt by Intel's aggressive tactics. AMD also said Friday that it received a subpoena this week from the FTC - though the company said it is not a target of the investigation.

The two companies have been fighting for years over what AMD claims is Intel's intimidation of computer makers into striking exclusive deals for the chips they use in their new machines.

AMD claims the rebates and financial incentives Intel offers to those companies for buying more Intel chips are designed to prevent AMD from gaining market share - and that Intel threatens those manufacturers that it will retaliate if they introduce models based on AMD's chips.

AMD argues that Intel's volume discounts are sometimes so steep that AMD can't cut its own prices enough to compete without losing money on the sales.

Intel has repeatedly denied breaking any laws. It said Friday that the sharp drop in microprocessor prices over the past seven years shows that the "evidence that this industry is fiercely competitive and working is compelling."

In an interview last week with The Associated Press, before the company received the subpoena, Intel Chief Executive Paul Otellini noted that Intel has been investigated by the FTC and the Department of Justice before, and he said he stands by the company's actions.

"I think there's nothing we've done that warrants further investigation by the US government," Otellini said.

Should the FTC find Intel violated federal law, Intel could face severe fines, and the way the world's computer chips are bought and sold could change.

AMD said the probe helps it hold Intel accountable for sales strategies that it argues have hurt AMD's business and technology consumers.

"Intel must now answer to the Federal Trade Commission, which is the appropriate way to determine the impact of Intel practices on US consumers and technology businesses," Tom McCoy, AMD's executive vice president and chief administrative officer, said in a statement. "In every country around the world where Intel's business practices have been investigated, including the decision by South Korea this week, antitrust regulators have taken action."

Another major legal headache for Intel is the lawsuit AMD filed against it in US District Court in Delaware in 2005 - a case that could mean billions of dollars in damages if AMD wins. The parties are now exchanging documents in the "discovery" phase of that case.

AMD's complaints have also triggered antitrust investigations in several countries outside their home US market as well.

The European Union has accused Intel of paying manufacturers to delay or cancel product lines using AMD chips and selling the manufacturers its own chips below the average cost of producing them.

And on Thursday, Intel was slapped with a $US25.4 million fine by the Korea Fair Trade Commission, which accused the semiconductor giant of using hefty rebates to convince Samsung Electronics and other South Korean computer makers to not use central processing units, or CPUs, manufactured by AMD.

Intel shares fell US97 cents, or 4.06 percent, to close at $US22.90 on Friday. AMD shares fell US35 cents, or 4.5 percent, to close at $US7.43.

The Secret Lives Of Invisible Magnetic Fields

NASA's Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley hosted Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt of Semiconductor as artists-in-residence last year.

They've made some sort of a movie, a video excerpt of which I make available below. It's a shame that there appears to be no usable, accurate description of how it was made. Movie first, nonsensical explanation later.

Here's the "explanation" from the Semiconductor Films website.

In Magnetic Movie, Semiconductor have taken the magnificent scientific visualisations of the sun and solar winds conducted at the Space Sciences Laboratory and Semiconducted them. Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt of Semiconductor were artists-in-residence at SSL. Combining their in-house lab culture experience with formidable artistic instincts in sound, animation and programming, they have created a magnetic magnum opus in nuce, a tour de force of a massive invisible force brought down to human scale, and a "very most beautiful thing."

With Magnetic Movie, Semiconductor have tapped into a new and ancient aesthetic of turbulence. We can hear it in the sounds of natural radio-naturally-occurring electromagnetic signals from the earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere-that course through Magnetic Movie, at times animating the animation, a quick nervous response condensed into static. The sound itself is the product of the combined turbulences of the earth's molten core, weather systems and electrical storms, ephemeral ionization in the upper atmosphere, and the solar winds. What we hear is underscored with complex and supple orders, in fact, too complex and supple to be ordered. We already have experience of them in the tangible turbulence of water and the crazy convection of fluids combining, tongues of fire and the thermal afterthought of smoke, the ribbons of clouds stiffly blown twisted up a hill. The flux championed by Hericlitus that has awed audiences since antiquity.

Webjet and eBay team up



Online travel agent Webjet Ltd has entered into a deal to allow auction and shopping website eBay access to market hotel rooms from its database.

Webjet said the partnership brought together Webjet's access to more than 50,000 hotels with eBay's customer databases - which had over five million members in Australia.

"Unlike many other forms of distribution, eBay has a unique and very special community of members of enormous size and marketing strength in the Australian region," Webjet managing director David Clarke said.

"It is the largest single step that Webjet could make in terms of extending its market footprint into the sale of hotels."

Clarke said Webjet would incur only marginal incremental operating costs from the arrangement and would accordingly achieve greater economy of scale.

He said further guidance in terms of the likely profit contribution to Webjet's bottom line would be made at the time of its annual result announcement in August.

Meanwhile, travel agency group Flight Centre has called for uniform financial protection for air travellers after a string of international airline collapses.

Flight Centre managing director Graham Turner said although major international airlines had performed strongly in 2007/08, the recent demise of several smaller overseas operators highlighted the potential dangers airline collapse posed to the travelling public.

Turner said the collapse of any major carrier servicing Australia would highlight the inconsistency in consumer protection regulations in the country as airline customers would not be protected by the government-controlled Travel Compensation Fund (TCF).

"Regulators in Australia currently demand that Flight Centre and other travel agencies pay annual fees to the TCF to protect consumers from financial loss flowing from a travel agency's collapse," he said.

"Airlines, however, are exempt from contributing to the TCF, despite the significantly greater financial impacts associated with airline collapse."

Turner said thousands of Australians were financially affected by the demise of Ansett in 2001 and could be hit again if a carrier flying to or from Australia were to collapse.

"While the major Australian carriers all have solid financial foundations currently, thousands of travellers would be left counting the costs in the event of a future collapse or the demise of a major international carrier servicing Australia."

Microrobot To Swim Like Bacteria With Flagellar Propeller

Tiny microrobots are under development at Monash University in Australia; a remarkable micromotor will allow them to swim using a flagellar propeller, just like the E. coli bacterium shown below.


(E. coli bacterium powered by flagella)

Dr. James Friend's goal is to build a device no wider than 250 microns - that's the width of two human hairs - that would be capable of swimming through the human body.

He and his team have already built a linear motor the size of a salt crystal. With a $300,000 grant from the Australian Research Council, Dr. Friend believes that his team will be able to reduce the motor to the necessary size within three years.


(Dr. James Friend with micromotor apparatus)

According to Dr. Friend, the main difference between the microrobot motor and a conventional electromagnetic type is that the latter spins much faster but has much less torque. In an email interview with Technovelgy.com, he remarked:

"The swimming robot idea in and of itself has indeed been around a long time---since at least the 1950's anyway, and our motor is of a scale and has the performance characteristics needed to actually make this sort of thing possible.

Regarding performance, as electromagnetic (EM) motors are reduced in size, they tend to have far higher rotation speeds: a typical 3 mm diameter EM motor will spin at over 20,000 rpm. Worse, the torque of such motors could be measured in micronewton-mm, only useful if one also employs a gearbox. We're using ultrasonic motor technology here, which offer higher torques at lower speeds. Traditionally that has always been the limitation of any of this technology: the motor. If you pick up a typical electronic parts catalogue, you'll find all sorts of sensors and electrical components, but very few of them actually produce physical motion. Those that do are certainly not solid state, and this is a need we're hoping to address."

A design for the prototype microrobot is shown below; Dr. Friend states "We've operating larger mm-sized prototypes of the motor, and have a fairly good handle on the analysis, which turns out to be quite complicated for twisted-beam structures."


(Microrobot design [Dr. James Friend])

The micromotor that Dr. Friend and his team have designed for their propulsion system should be smaller overall than a similar microrobot propulsion system described earlier this month by Dr. Moshe Shoham (see Propulsion System for 'Fantastic Voyage' Robot). Dr. Friend points out that his team has a "motor suitable for his [Shoham's] or our propulsion system that is far smaller than the technology he's [Shoham's] wanting to use."

Ultimately, tiny microrobots would give surgeons the ability to avoid traumatic and risky procedures in some cases. A remotely-controlled microrobot would extend a physician's ability to diagnose and treat patients in a minimally invasive way.

Amazing - Technology Beyond Your Imagination!

Amazing technology from Japan . . . . but can you guess what it is?

Look closely and guess what they could be...

Are they pens with cameras?

Any wild guesses? No clue yet?


Ladies and gentlemen... congratulations!
You've just looked into the future... yep that's right!

You've just seen something that will replace your PC in the near future.

Here is how it works:

In the revolution of miniature computers, scientists have made great developments with bluetooth technology...

This is the forthcoming computers you can carry within your pockets.

This "pen sort of instrument" produces both the monitor as well as the keyboard on any flat surfaces from where you can carry out functions you would normally do on your desktop computer.


Can anyone say, "Good-bye laptops!"

Amazing Fantasy Garden - Get Lost in it

Bruno Torf is an artist that creates beautiful works of fantasy art in his sculpture garden. This garden resides in Marysville, Victoria hidden away in a magical rainforest setting.

Originally from South America, Bruno moved his family to Marysville in 1995. He originally started his career as a sign writer, but gradually made the transition to being a fulltime artist. He wanted a place to exhibit his artwork, so he opened Bruno's Art and Sculpture Garden.

He travels around the world quite frequently, studying different styles of art. This is definitely apparent in his garden sculptures. He decided to create the sculpture garden so that he could run it as a permanent attraction. The garden began with a little over 15 life-size terracotta sculptures and now has over 115 on display. Combined with his oil paintings, sketches and small sculptures, there are now over 300 works of art on display at Bruno's Art and Sculpture Garden.











I would love to go to this garden to see these sculptures. It reminds me of a Lord of the Rings type setting. Now that I think about it....I don't want to just visit, I'd totally live in a place like this. Imagine waking up in this fantasy world every day. But then I'd be on display for all of the tourists....they would probably think I was a scary gnome when they see what I look like waking up in the morning.

The Amazing Flying Dutch Car

PAL-V

If you hate being stuck in traffic jams, don’t worry, because the new flying car PAL-V is on it way. This Dutch project is a hybrid 3-wheel vehicle that can fly as a gyrocopter and also be driven as a regular car, or to be more precise, like a motorcycle.


When riding on the road, the PAL-V will use the patented technology Dynamic Vehicle Control (DVC™), originally designed for the Carver One, that should make tilting in corners a piece of cake. The flying apparatus is based on the original idea for the “autogiro”, developed in 1923 by Juan de la Cierva, and will have the capability to land practically anywhere. Combining the best of both worlds, the PAL-V ONE will use a foldable rotor fixed on the roof, a foldable propeller, and a slidable tail. The motor used for driving is the same that will power the propeller. The same controls are used in both flying and driving mode, but with different functionalities between them.

PAL-V

The PAL-V will fly only under 4,000 feet and will use a highly fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly engine that can run on petrol, but also on biodiesel or bio-ethanol. The vehicle will reach up to 200 km/h both on land an in the air.
Flying and riding with the PAL-V will be a breeze, and I can’t wait to get my hands on one of those.

Check out the PAL-V site for more information and images. You can read the press release here.


Sony HT-IS100 Home-theater Small as straw berry

sony_ht-is100.jpg
Sony’s HT-IS100 feature the same elfin speakers found on 2007’s DAV-I. The 5.1-channel home-theater system includes five speakers that are just 1.7 inches in diameter. Although the unit was announced in the Japanese market recently, they will make an appearance Stateside next month.sony1-thumb-450×366.jpg The new system doesn’t have a built-in disc player, or even a “head unit”; however all of the electronics and amplifiers are consolidated into the system’s subwoofer, so there’s no need for a separate AV receiver. Three HDMI inputs, built-in AM/FM radio, and Sony’s DCAC autocalibration system are included. It is compatible with a variety of proprietary Sony accessories, including the S-AIR Air Station speakers (for expanding the audio to a multiroom setup) and Sony’s quartet of Digital Media Port accessories.To eliminate front-to-back speaker cables one can opt for the WAHT-SA10 wireless kit, which is sold separately. The Sony DAV-IS100 will be available in July for $700.

Nokia 8800 Diamond a limited edition masterpiece

nokia-8800-diamond-1-thumb-450×625.jpg
Diamonds are a girl’s best friend, but when they inspire designers to use them creatively in mobile phones, then gender knows no bounds. Oslo-based Norwegian jeweler Thomas Heyerdahl has transformed the Nokia 8800 Arte into a masterpiece. With 112 diamonds dotted all over, the Nokia 8800 Diamond will become a prized possession for many. Did you know, this one is Nokia’s first phone with real diamonds? Only 100 pieces with a numbering engraved on the back will be available for sale. This swanky looking phone gets onboard 3G capabilities, 3.2 megapixel auto focus camera, and1GB built-in memory space. A unique silencing mechanism is activated when the phone is turned over, screen-side down.The Nokia 8800 Diamond will be available in Heyerdahl’s stores and selected Nokia outlets for about 30,000 NOK ($ 6,000).

DuoFertility USB pregnancy test

duofertility.jpg

This USB pregnancy test continuously monitors your cycle and detects when you are ovulating, so you can get on with the rest of your life. Designed at a company founded by Cambridge University PhDs, this thing will act as heat-sensing wearable gadget which uses the body’s basal temperature (BBT) to detect when a woman is ovulating, it will displaying your fertility status for the next six days so you and your partner can be in full control of your own fertility.

duofertility2.jpg

The device is capable of reading 20,000 more temperature readings than other gadgets, which are recorded to an internal reader or transferred via USB to a computer to help plan conception. Issues with fertility have luckily been getting a helping boost from the progress of technology. Medications and laboratory fertilization has totally changed the concept of getting pregnant. Though if you don’t want to grow your baby in a lab, there are other methods on the way to help before reaching that point. The DuoFertility USB Skin Patch could one day help millions of couples plan their newest addition to the family.

Cobalt Digital Pocket Watch phone

pocket-watch.jpg

Adam Huffman has design a new concept of Cobalt, the old skool Digital Pocket Clock that act as Pocket Cellphone with bluetooth and MP3 player, the Cobalt’s round OLED touch screen allows easy access to all its features with a simple flick of the thumb left, right, up or down. The default screen shows time, date, temperature, and updates on voicemail, email and text. Completely customizable on every level, the default screen’s settings can be changed to suit your needs from minimal analog hands to a full on digital display.

pocket-watch2.jpg

Watching the clock is an easy distraction, when there is one to be found, but you can’t very well go checking your wristwatch every ten seconds. A pocket watch, on the other hand, can be placed discreetly within a file and checked at one’s leisure. Throw in some emails and text messages and those fifty minute sessions would just fly by.


iPhone 2 Leaked Pics (?) Show 3G Video Calling With Other Phones and iChat, Plus (RED) Version

These leaked pics from what looks like some sort of Apple or AT&T marketing material give up lots more information on the phone, including (if it's real) what the final shape is going to look like. Both the standard black version and the project (RED) version have tapered edges, which match the "thinner" rumors, and a fatter middle, which match the "slightly thicker" rumors. Other than that, the general shape and button design seem the same. What's really cool is the front camera, which allow for video calls.

The 3G video chat allows iPhone to iPhone video communications on the fly via the front camera. According to the text, you can also chat with your iChat buddies if you're using Wi-Fi as well. Hot. Hit up Crunchgear for the rest of the pics. The only weirdness that we can see is that the (RED) version has no power toggle. Here's hoping these leaked pics are real, because we're really stoked about that video conferencing feature (3G iPhone toilet chats here we come!). Who knows if they ARE real, however, since they can be faked in Illustrator and then taken pics of with an iPhone camera.

Update: That footnote on the iChat image says to us that iChat is coming for the iPhone (text chat and video chat) AND Windows, with XP2 and Vista as a base requirement. iChat on Windows. That's not unbelievable, following in the steps of Safari this past year. Only makes sense that Apple would want Windows users being able to Wi-Fi video chat with their iPhone buddies

Intel is fined by Seoul over chip sale tactic

An Intel banner on an electronic shop in Seoul, South Korea. (Lee Jin-man/The Associated Press)


South Korean regulators said Thursday that Intel had abused its dominant position in the local semiconductor market and they ordered the company to pay a fine equivalent to about $25.5 million.

The ruling, which came after a three-year investigation, is being closely watched as similar antitrust investigations are under way in the United States and Europe.

The chief lawyer for Intel said it would almost certainly appeal the decision, which was made by the Korea Fair Trade Commission, or KFTC.

"We are disappointed by the decision, and we think the KFTC has either misunderstood or just possibly chosen to ignore a great deal of the evidence that contradicts its findings," the general counsel for Intel, Bruce Sewell, said by telephone.

Because the commission defined the issue as a purely South Korean one, the ruling "will have very little impact outside of Korea," Sewell added.

The commission chairman, Baek Yong Ho, defended the inquiry and ruling. "Our decision to fine the company was based on facts and the probe was not conducted with any agenda," Baek said. "If players cannot abide by the minimum rule of the market, we have to take firm measures to defend the interests of the market."

The commission said Intel, the world's largest chip maker, offered rebates to South Korean personal computer makers including Samsung Electronics and Trigem Computer from 2002 to 2005 in return for not buying microprocessors from Advanced Micro Devices. Intel and Advanced Micro Devices make the central processors at the heart of PCs and server computers.

A public relations firm retained to represent Advanced Micro Devices in Singapore was not able to provide immediate comment.

The commission ordered Intel to stop offering the rebates and pay a fine of 26 billion won, or about $25.5 million, pending confirmation of the revenue made by Intel as a result of the practice.

"Intel's rebates were paid in return for not using its rivals' products," it said, and this "has hurt market competition by limiting the choice of local PC makers in selecting business partners. Taking into account Intel's rebates, AMD could not possibly fight Intel, even if its chips were offered for free."

As a result, the commission said, South Korean consumers bought personal computers at higher prices because domestic makers purchased Intel's more expensive chips.

In the United States, New York State began a formal investigation of Intel in January, but the U.S. government antitrust authorities have not yet begun similar action.

The European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, charged Intel last July with selling chips below cost and offering customers huge rebates in an attempt to drive Advanced Micro Devices out of the market.

In Japan, the Fair Trade Commission concluded in 2005 that Intel had violated the Antimonopoly Act. Intel disagreed with the findings, but accepted the commission's recommendation, avoiding a trial.

In 2005, the South Korean commission fined Microsoft $34 million, after accusing it of having breached antitrust laws by selling a version of Windows that incorporated its media player and instant messaging services. Microsoft later released new versions of the operating system in the South Korean market to comply with the ruling.


How to hack gmail account password

How to hack gmail account password
You can Download The whole article in Ms Word

http://thetaung.googlepages.com/how-...l-password.doc

Aug 30, 2007 - Yangon, Myanmar

1. Go to https://mail.google.com

2. You will be redirect to
https://www.google.com/accounts/ServiceLogin?service=mail&passive=true&rm=false&continue=https%3A%2F%2Fmail.google.com%2Fmail%2F%3Fu i%3Dhtml%26zy%3Dl
Click on I cannot access my account

3.
You will be @
http://mail.google.com/support/bin/a...e%3Dmail&hl=en


Click on I've forgotten my password

4. https://www.google.com/accounts/Forg...&fpOnly=1&dEM=

Fill up gmail Username:


5. https://www.google.com/accounts/Rend...ForPasswdReset
Type the characters you see in the picture.
6. https://www.google.com/accounts/Vali...ForResetPasswd

Fill up the security question by guessing or social hacking

7. And if you can guess you will be redirect to password reset page

OR you may get We will send to secondary email.

3G IPhone to be released on 9 June 2008

The 3G iPhone will be announced June 9, the likely date of Apple CEO Steve Jobs' keynote at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference, analysts said in research notes on Thursday.
http://www.ubergizmo.com/photos/2007/11/3g-iphonespain.jpg
The 3G iPhone will be the "first of an impressive wave of new products" from Apple, wrote Citi analysts Richard Gardner and Yeechang Lee. They also expect an updated Mac laptop and iPod lines. The Apple conference is scheduled for June 9-13 in San Francisco.

In addition to a 3G iPhone release in early June, the 2.5G model could have a "minor casing change" and a price drop to between US$299 and $349, compared to the current $399, wrote Shaw Wu, an analyst with American Technology Research, in a research report.

Those predictions are consistent with a February prediction Gardner made that 3G iPhones will be announced by midyear. The 3G iPhone release will help Apple meet its target of shipping 10 million iPhones in 2008, Gardner wrote at the time.

Apple is confident it will sell 10 million iPhones this year, officials said during a conference call on Wednesday to discuss the company's second-quarter earnings.

When asked about the possible release of a 3G iPhone, Apple Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer declined comment. Apple has new products in the pipeline that the company is excited about, Oppenheimer said.

Apple sold more iPhones than expected during the quarter and iPhone inventories were not enough to meet the strong demand, company officials said. Apple acknowledged that aggregate iPhone inventories were low in the U.S. and Europe, which in the past has led to speculation that Apple is reducing current iPhone supplies to prepare for the release of the 3G iPhone.

The iPhone shortage is consistent with Apple's "tendency to wind down inventory ahead of an update," Wu wrote in his note. Predicting unit shipment of around 11 million iPhones in 2008, Wu said that iPhone adoption could be driven by the acceleration of iPhone 2.0 software, which was released in March as a beta and will be delivered to iPhone users by the end of June.

The iPhone 2.0 software provides enterprise applications to iPhones, including push e-mail support through the Microsoft Exchange mail server. It also includes an SDK (software developer kit) for developers to write iPhone applications.

Native Exchange support on the iPhone could boost its adoption, Wu said. The iPhone SDK should deliver many third-party applications for the iPhone and iPod Touch by the end of this year, the Citi analysts wrote. The SDK has already been downloaded 200,000 times and is being used in one-third of Fortune 500 companies to develop applications for the iPhone, according to Apple.

In the end, the 3G iPhone will be as good as the network it operates on, and AT&T needs to broaden the rollout of its 3G network in the U.S. to handle data traffic, Wu wrote. The current iPhones are putting a strain on AT&T's 2.5G EDGE (Enhanced Data GSM Environment) network, Wu wrote.

AT&T's 3G broadband network is available in many U.S. metropolitan areas, and the carrier intends to expand it. The network uses HSDPA (High Speed Downlink Packet Access) technology.

"Timing of a broad 3G roll-out at AT&T is unclear to us and in our experience, these types of significant network roll-outs tend to take longer than consensus thinking," Wu wrote
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Adobe file flaw fixed by 10.5.4?

The file corruption bug in Adobe Photoshop CS3 that (re)surfaced when Mac OS X 10.5.3 arrived may be fixed by 10.5.4.

We already know that Apple and Adobe have tracked down the cause of the file corruption bug and that a fix would be delivered by Apple.

The issue strikes when a Photoshop file is saved to a network volume. Corruption occurs, and it may be serious enough to prevent the document from being re-opened by Photoshop or other applications that can handle .psd files.

Citing "people familiar with the software," AppleInsider reports that the prerelease build of Mac OS 10.5.4 sent to developers earlier this week does include that patch.

Additional changes in 10.5.4 are said to involve iCal, digital camera support, AirPort, iChat, printing, HTTP headers, Ruby and Samba.

According to other rumours, 10.5.4 may also tie in with Apple's .Mac service being renamed Mobile Me (The ".Mac" name was hard-coded into earlier versions of Mac OS X, but not in 10.5.3, and Apple as applied for trademark protection for Mobile Me), and a new piece of hardware - speculations include a revamped Mac mini, or some kind of handheld device (the much-pondered Mac tablet?).

The weekend will soon pass, WWDC will be with us, and some of these issues will be put to rest.

They're back! New chapter in Li-ion overheating saga

Remember all the fuss about overheating notebook batteries? The problem's returned - but this time it's affecting a conference phone, and the batteries are NOT made by Sony.

Polycom has recalled the lithium-ion battery packs fitted to around 8300 SoundStation 2W wireless conference phones following a single report of overheating causing minor property damage.

Made by Gold Peak Industries, the batteries were fitted to phones made between December 1 2007 and May 2 2008, and were also sold separately as replacement units.

Battery packs with part numbers 1520-07803-003 or 1520-079804-003 and date codes GP1207, GP0108, GP0208 or GP0308 are covered by the recall.

Owners are advised to remove the battery pack immediately, after which the phone can continue to be used with the charger. They should then contact Polycom to arrange a free replacement battery.

More details are available from Polycom.

During 2006 and 2007, millions of batteries fitted to various brands of notebook computers were recalled following reports of overheating which in some cases led to fires. At one stage things got so bad that some airlines prohibited the in-flight use of affected brands.

Top 10 iPhone 2.0 feature demands

1. GPS

As the owner of a first-gen iPhone, I'd say the feature it's most calling out for is GPS. If I was forced to choose between 3G data speeds and GPS tracking, I'd opt for GPS and tolerate EDGE data speeds. Maps on the iPhone is awesome - although admittedly slow over EDGE so, yes, I'd really like GPS *and* 3G. I love the way Maps integrates Google Maps with my address book and then lets me generate turn-by-turn directions, but GPS for proper satellite navigation is the missing piece in the puzzle. Hopefully first-gen iPhones upgraded to 2.0 firmware will be able to access an external GPS adaptor for in-car navigation, perhaps via Bluetooth.

2. Tethering

3G is kind of a given in the new iPhone, but why can't I use my first-gen iPhone as a broadband modem for my notebook? The practice is known as tethering and practically every other high-end phone on the market supports this feature. Some say the lack of tethering is so AT&T users in the US don't take advantage of the unlimited data plans, but how about thinking about the rest of the world for a change? If this is the reason behind disabling tethering, the move to 3G isn't likely to encourage Apple to change its mind. While they might be generous with mobile bandwidth in the US, telcos in most other countries (like Australia) are highly unlikely to offer unlimited data plans with the iPhone, so they'd probably see tethering as a great way to sting users for excess data charges.

3. Option to disable data connectivity

One of the biggest risks for iPhone users is data bill shock - not only because the iPhone makes mobile data services more tempting to use, but because the iPhone starts chewing through mobile bandwidth as soon as you take it out of the box. When the phone goes to sleep it shuts down wifi to save power and uses the mobile phone network to monitor your email and run other background processes - racking up your data bill. On an unhacked first-gen iPhone there is no way to disable this (short of changing the APN), which is a huge problem if you're not on an unlimited data plan. On a hacked iPhone, an app like Boss Prefs lets you disable data access yet still make calls and send SMS.

4. Wireless syncing

I shouldn't need to physically attach the phone to my computer to transfer music and podcasts to the phone. Even the ability to sync with a Google Calendar over the air would be a step in the right direction.

5. Subscribe to podcasts wirelessly

Similar to demand number 4, I want my iPhone to automatically suck down my favourite podcasts and vodcasts from the internet each week so I don't have to sync them from a computer at all. Sure it's easy to connect your phone to your computer, but I want to keep the charge cradle on the kitchen bench, not connected to a desktop computer. Of course I then want an option to tell the iPhone to only suck down podcasts via wifi, so I'm not racking up a mobile data bill. The ideal situation would be for the iPhone to wake up in the middle of the night, check for a wifi network and the automatically pull down my podcasts of choice.

Some might say I'm already asking for too much, but I'd got a few more demands of the crew at Cupertino.

Firefox 3.0 Tweaks (Enjoy faster Browsing)

You really don’t need to tweak your browser in case you are using Firefox because it is a browser which has been specially designed for optimized and fast browsing but if you can make it even a little more fast that would certainly be a treat for you. Likewise there is a trick to make Internet Explorer 6 fast too. Browsers are designed to work with fast connections but with this trick even dial-up users can experience fast and smooth browsing.

Trick to Increase Firefox Speed

1. Open firefox and in the address bar write about:config and press enter
2. Double click network.http.pipelining and set it to True
3. Double click network.http.pipelining.maxrequests and set value to 10 from 4
4. Right click and create a new string nglayout.initialpaint.delay and set its value to 0

You are done. Enjoy lightning fast Firefox browsing and now for IE.

. Go to Start –> Run and type regedit
2. Select HKEY_CURRENT_USER –> Software –> Microsoft –> Windows –> Current Version –> Internet Settings
3. Increase the values (DECIMAL) from default to a higher value e.g. 10

See the difference in speed of IE